images/slider_image_01.jpg

NEW YORK METS MANIA

Top Banner Ads

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
 

You know things are getting serious when benches start clearing during a baseball game. It's not everyday you see a basebrawl but then the Phillies have Larry Bowa in their dugout so you can just about bet something is bound to happen. I am just surprised there was no incident the night before when the Mets were hacking their way to hitting a team-record eight home runs...especially with Bowa in the opposing dugout.

HanselRoblesThere was a time when it was simply expected to get some hefty chin music after a couple of home runs, and it was money in the bank if one "struck a pose" at the plate before beginning their home run trot. That's old-fashioned baseball. And, of course, Bowa is an old-fashioned baseball mind so it was quite interesting that each Philadelphia pitcher that was trotted out to the mound to share in the 16-7 shellacking never took umbrage to any of the Mets hitters hanging out over the plate and taking whopping batting practice swings. And it STILL didn't happen when Yoenis Cespedes continued the barrage with a two-run blast in the top of the first inning of the very next game.

Perhaps it was the fact that after the Mets grabbed a 3-0 lead, the Phillies tagged Noah Syndergaard for two two-run homers to take a 4-3 lead and it was a tight game. But the Phillies are in last place, the game really means nothing to them, so you would think that the time was ripe for a plunking. But other than Phillies starter Jerome Williams throwing a couple of pitches near Daniel Murphy's shoes...it was a whole lot of nothing.

Fast foward to the seventh inning with Hansel Robles on the mound. Robles has been doing a great job in some crucial situations. But he did something that finally got Bowa and the rest of the Phillies dugout to erupt. Darin Ruf was standing in the batter's box, with his head down, adjusting his feet, taking his time, and Robles went into his windup and lobbed a pitch right down the middle of the plate before Ruf even picked up his head to face him - he quick-pitched him.

Quick pitching is nothing new. In fact, a number of pitchers have done it over the years, anything to gain an advantage. It is part of baseball. But in this day and age of wearing armor up at the plate, and Little League rules of no barreling into the catcher on a play at the plate, it is deemed dangerous to throw a pitch when a batter is standing in the batter's box and not looking.

Bowa went into his usual tirade and began jawing at Robles immediately, as did the rest of the Phillies contingency. And then the benches began to empty and players from both sides were on the field. Robles seemed genuinely confused as to why there was such a ruckus over his attempt to surprise Ruf. Heck, Bartolo Colon has been quick pitching throughout the course of the season. But in this case, Ruf wasn't looking. Bowa kept pointing at his head while yelling at Robles. And Bowa had a point...what if Robles had hit Ruf in the head?

I am just wondering what Don Drysdale would have done. Or Nolan Ryan. I wonder if they would have been concerned that the batter wasn't looking. The fact that the batter was standing in the box should signal that they are ready to go. Pitchers would traditionally get upset and uncork a wild one if they thought the on deck hitter was getting too close in order to catch a better view. But again, times have changed. Some of the traditional parts of the game have been eliminated, a lot of it for the safety of the players.

Robles may have made an innocent attempt to quick pitch, but doing it when the player wasn't looking may not have been the wisest thing to do when you are a rookie. Baseball players have great memories. Bowa was ejected for his outburst, but it will be interesting to see how the old baseball mind exacts the revenge.

Leave your comments

Post comment as a guest

0
Your comments are subjected to administrator's moderation.
  • No comments found

 

FOLLOW US
Facebook
 

 

Archives

Opening Day usually brings optimism. It’s a new and fresh start. Every team is in the same position...no wins and no losses. But the New York Mets ...
[READ MORE]
My complaints as a New York Mets fan are pretty much in line with my fellow sufferers. But if I compartmentalize them, well, I can pretty much break ...
[READ MORE]
Thankfully it’s over. And if I were Buck Showalter, I would want it to be over. Nobody REALLY wants to leave a managing job, or head coaching job. ...
[READ MORE]
A year ago the New York Mets and the New York Yankees were both in first place. Today, as we are about to enter the month of September and the ...
[READ MORE]
What is happening with the 2023 New York Mets? This is just a BAD team. The difference between 1973 and 2023? The 1973 team actually WAS a good ...
[READ MORE]
New York Mets fans should be careful what they wish for. Sign that guy! Re-sign this guy! You just never know. The decline of Christian Yelich, Cody ...
[READ MORE]
Spring is in full swing as we made our first trip to Citifield for the home opener of the 2023 baseball season where New York-Presbyterian beat ADT ...
[READ MORE]
The New York Mets top prospects, while given a chance at the Major League level in 2022, will all begin 2023 down on the farm…well…not ...
[READ MORE]
Ya know…Jeurys Familia wasn’t exactly the Mets first choice. Nope, he wasn’t. Actually, the Mets were counting on some guy named Jenrry Mejia. ...
[READ MORE]
It was 50 years ago that would, in some ways, turn out to be a more amazing season than the season labeled “The Miracle Mets.” The difference is ...
[READ MORE]
When I was the host of my first call-in radio talk show, I had a caller who said, “I think the rules in baseball are dumb.” And I asked, “What ...
[READ MORE]
The New York Mets spent all but a few days of the 2022 season in first place. The spending of owner Steve Cohen, the dealings of general manager ...
[READ MORE]
Prev Next

New York Mets Logo

About New York Mets Mania

Alan Karmin is an award-winning journalist and author. He was born in Brooklyn, New York and spent most of his life growing up in the New Jersey suburbs. Alan's family were avid Brooklyn Dodgers fans and when the Dodgers moved west, the Mets became the team to root for. The Mets have always been a true focal point, Alan even wrote a term paper in high school to analyze what was wrong with the Mets. While at the University of Miami, Alan honed his craft covering the, gulp, Yankees during spring trainings in Fort Lauderdale for a local NBC affiliate, as well as the Associated Press and UPI. He broadcasted baseball games for the University of Miami, and spring training games for the Baltimore Orioles and Montreal Expos. New York Mets Mania is a forum for Alan to write about his favorite team and for baseball fans to chime in and provide their thoughts and ideas about New York's Amazin' Mets.